Horseproblems Australia – Blog 10th September, 2019

10Sepblog_1

10th September, 2019

Hi Folks. Hope You had a great Week. Lovely Weather here, 3mm each Night but lovely Sunny Days. The Crops are secured and they had better be because the Qld and NSW will be shipping it all out of here. This is what SA People had better realize!!!

I have spend the Week building the next Project. Mrs. HP Saddlery Room. She has waited long enough, keeping here stuff in the Horse Float nearby to the tie up Rails, so she should be really pleased in a couple of Days as I have broken the back of it.

Excuse the Pic. Could have done it in the Day, couldn’t I 🙂

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NOTE****

in the foreground, You can see the top of a New Creo Strainer Post, where this Week I have also extended the Tie Up Rails as it is getting too busy around here.

NOTE*****  also, that I have put an angle Bar across to the Main upright, TO STOP Horses waking around the end of the tie up rail.

A BLAST FROM THE PAST

16 Years ago, we bred this Darling Horse, by High Country Indiana out of Cappo’s Mum, started Her as a 3 Year Old and sold Her to a Learner Rider who she was with for 12 Years, happily, at the Adelaide Airport. 

Now she in on Trial with Linda’s Mum as Her Horse died of Colic recently.

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Tomorrow, Mrs. HP is having a trial ride at Gainsborough 🙂

THE HORSE INDUSTRY TEACHING SYSTEMS

You hear a lot about Horse Welfare coming out of Equestrian Australia but daily see Horses being put through Hell in the name of Riding.

How is that this Young Lady can be let compete without some Official approaching Her and getting help for Her????? It doesn;t happen, never happens and about time it did happen.

Why are they always behind the times??????????????

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Now tell me why this Horse is allowed at a Comp??? Strangely reminincent of Sarah Waugh ( scroll down the page)

TEACHING HELPLESSNESS

For most of my Life, I have been warning Ladies…yes Ladies, all Ladies, Thousands of them, to not tie near the end of a Tie up facility, for their Horse can die as a result. I have probably related the story of the Lady with the wonderful 3 Year Old that just competed in the Young Horse at Dressage with the Start but he died a Week later when she didn’t take my advice.

but it isn’t just the tying NEAR the end of a Rail that is the problem but it is the abject lack of any knowledge how to tie a Horse up, other than to TWINE!!!!! It is astounding. They don;t even know HOW to tie a Horse up properly, so you see loops of 300mm around the Rail, allowing Horses to walk sideways and go to the end.

So I failed. Not possible, can;t teach any of them and none will listen. So I built the barriers 🙂

THE CHESTNUT MARE WITH THE BAD CASE OF LEARNED HELPLESSNESS

She is back here, to complete the new Her for she is so stuffed, in all areas, it is unbelievable. Today, when Mrs. HP had Her Head around for a moment, she attempted to savage Her Leg.

None of it is the fault of the Horse of course. The Industry is a shambles!!!

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Prior to Sand Colic Treatment

THE VICTOR HARBOR COLT STARTING COMP

Well, he is back, after 10 Days off, to learn to Leg Yield and to act like a Dressage Horse. The Owner has decided that he is too tall for Him and is going to advertise Him for Sale.

Here is Mrs. HP, on board, ready to go to the Arena.

More on this next Week, including a Video of me riding Him, to intro Him to the Arena and CORNERS.

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THE TURN AROUND OF PROCESS OF THIS LITTLE HORSE

Two Rides this Week and he is sore.

He is sore, because the correct Muscles were suddenly used, rather than the incorrect Muscles.

Here he is, at evening Feed time, with all feeds having been put in place and Horses happily eating their lovely Hard Feeds. He has gone behind his Stable, out of Site of the other Horses and is reflecting in sadness, as to what just happened to Him, shocked, for he is the Mini Cappo who never does anything wrong 😨😨😨

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So what has happened during his few Years of Training? Who is responsible????

Well the answer is easy. It’s the Coach in this Case, one that produced Rearers, one that rides with HELD HORSES but Hell accurate and wins wins wins.

It’s the Judges in this State, who cannot identify that when a Horse comes into their Ring, and it doesn’t have the obvious Muscle Tone that proves CORRECT TRAINING and indeed, they do not frame their scores accordingly. This is a major Judging problem but one caused by Judges not being Riders

YOU BE THE JUDGE

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Yesterday, the lovely Boy was picked up and the lovely Young Rider was given some confronting advice about training Dressage and what has happened to Her. Terribly confusing.

She had a short and easy Lesson, just prior to leaving. Advised to change the way of Riding and Mrs. HP showed Her.

It was an astounding event but as Mrs. HP encouraged Him with Her voice, he actually started to DANCE for the first time in his Life!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Horses….amazing Animals.

So now, Mrs. HP will be teaching the Young Lady ( who didn’t realize she could be taught via the Internet. She lives too far away. We wish them both the very best. 😍😍

Never the fault of the Kid. Always the Industry.

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

This will explain all……..so how is Your Coach going????

 

RIDICULOUS STATEMENT OF THE WEEK AND POSSIBLE MORE TO THE EYE 🤔🤔🤔

I personally knew this horse soon after the Waugh accident . I was unaware of his history, but found him to be the sweetest, kindest horse totally suitable for any sort of rider. There is no single blame here, but the horse was for sure a very minor factor. No simple answer either.

Vicki Roycroft 

and then another

 I did put beginners on this horse!! Do NOT think all OTT horses require retraining, unless they were badly trained in the first place… however I certainly would not allow a beginner girl to ride side saddle in an open field apparently holding a phone on ANY horse.. DO NOT BLAME THIS HORSE.

Is this a post from Vicki Roycroft recently J0hn? I rang her several.years ago and asked her how she’d found out that the horse her student bought in June 2009 called ‘Bowen’ was the horse Sarah was riding in 2009 .She told me that the horse was suitable for beginners in a roundyard or arena just dangerous in open spaces .I asked her then why did the horse supplier Glenn Manton in Dubbo not tell TAFE in their post accident review , the police in his statements and Workcover in their 2 interviews that he’d picked up the horse from a friend racehorse trainer and that his name was Snakey Thought- and not ‘ the horse has no name ‘ and he’d only owned him for 1 week before providing him to Dubbo TAFE ? Vicki just hung up on me – because she knew that Manton had done the wrong thing in lying about this horse to the TAFE staff( who were at fault too as they did NO assessment of the horses before using them ) so I’d be Interested to know when she posted that comment.Our phone call.was probably in 2014 sometime .By the way the first day if the Senate Hearing into the feasibility of a national traceability register for all horses went really well and we head to Cbr fir the 2nd day of hearings with horse industry- witnesses on 20th Sept – so far all horse industry groups have said they want a horse register.
Watch this space 😊

Juliana Waugh

THE SENATE INQUIRY INTO HORSE TRACTABILITY

‘Horse with no name’ culture of untraceable history proves deadly for riders, inquiry told

The parents of a teenage girl who died after falling off a horse say riders are being subjected to preventable deadly risks because of ineffective systems to trace the animal’s history.

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Key points:

The lack of a national horse register means new owners have no idea of a horse’s history
The Horse Industry Council says there are already multiple registers in place, which result in duplications
An emergency register in 2007 at the time of the equine influenza outbreak was deemed effective, but later abandoned
Public hearings for the inquiry into the feasibility of a National Horse Traceability Register for all horses will be held in Sydney today and later this month in Canberra.

Horses are among the nation’s most deadly animal and advocates for the scheme say it could play a significant role in managing diseases and biosecurity, prevent rural crime, and even save a rider’s life if there was adequate access to a horse’s history.

The horse with no name
The drive for a National Horse Traceability Register has been spearheaded by Mark and Juliana Waugh whose daughter Sarah died in 2009 when she fell from a horse during a riding lesson at Dubbo TAFE as part of a jillaroo course.

The horse was called Dargo after he arrived at the TAFE without a name, or known history.

But Dargo did have a history, and it was one that a coronial inquest in 2011 found made the horse unsuitable for a beginner rider course.

The horse had been recently used for racing and had no rest period, or time to be retrained.

The absence of a horse register meant that vital information was not made available to the TAFE.

Two months after Sarah’s death, Dargo became lost in the system again when he was advertised for sale in a well-known equine magazine and sold to a horse-riding school in NSW.

Ms Waugh told the inquest it was described as “a pretty horse with an impeccable temperament”.

She said there was no mention of the horse’s racing history, his time at the TAFE, or his name.

Ms Waugh argued that the absence of a national registration system meant horses were getting lost in the system with potentially fatal consequences.

“If a National Horse Identification and Traceability System [or Register] had existed in March 2009, our daughter Sarah Kate Waugh would most probably still be alive and practising as a rural vet,” Ms Waugh outlined in her submission to the inquiry.

“Sarah’s death was preventable and was due in part to false information being given about the history of a horse and its suitability for a specific purpose in a NSW Government workplace.”

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11474368-3x2-700x467 Facing neglect and the knackery
Equine welfare advocates have also pushed for a national register to promote owner accountability and potentially deter negligent backyard breeding.

When Bianca Folber — who is part of the Australian Equine Unification Scheme — purchased a scrawny filly at an Echuca saleyard for just $120, it triggered her passion for horse owners to be made more accountable.

The horse, affectionately named Callie by her children, was underweight and unable to be transported to South Australia for two weeks until she regained her strength to survive the journey.

The auctioneer had no information on Callie to pass on to potential buyers, leaving Ms Folber in the dark about the filly’s age, breed and vaccinations.

“Currently the saleyards and the knackeries are seen as easy ways for people to dispose of their horses and it’s a bonus that they receive payment for doing so,” Ms Folber said.

She said if it was mandatory that only registered horses could be sold at saleyards or submitted to knackeries, people would either register the animals or stop breeding them.

Ms Folber also called for better control over which animals ended up at slaughterhouses.

“Through my volunteer work to improve equine welfare I have seen many cases of people giving away their beloved old horses to be companions and then they discover they have actually been sold for meat,” she said.

“The UK system allows for people to actually flag their horse as ‘not for slaughter’ and I feel Australian horse owners would benefit from a similar flag.”

Untangling multiple registers
Prior to the equine influenza outbreak in 2007, the Australian Horse Industry Council developed an emergency contact database to better track horses.

Ms Waugh told the inquiry that in August 2007 there were 800 horses registered but the outbreak prompted thousands of owners to register and add their details.

However, no ongoing funding was provided for the emergency register and it became redundant.

The industry and the Commonwealth spent more than $130 million to contain the outbreak.

The on-flow to the industry ran into the millions of dollars in lost income, cancellations, and restrictions on racing and breeding activities.

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An emergency database to better track horses was established prior to the equine influenza outbreak, but was disbanded through lack of funding. (ABC News: File photo)
The Australian Horse Industry Council’s president, Mark Burnell, said the register was very effective at the time of the outbreak.

He said the council welcomed the introduction of a national register for safety and biosecurity purposes, but he said there were already multiple registers horse owners had to comply with.

“There’s concern from some organisations about an increased layer of compliance and cost ultimately to the horse owner,” he said.

Mr Burnell used the example of his daughter’s pony, which is registered across a number of organisations including pony club and interschool competitions.

“So the horse has three different names, she’s got a registered Welsh name, she’s got a paddock name, she’s got a pony club name, and we try to do the right thing.

“Her horse is typical of what you get of many competition horses, they turn up on many registers already.

“One of the concerns is how to unfold the duplications in the system and just have one clear registration.”
Support needed for successful scheme

The NSW Farmers Association has thrown its support behind a traceability scheme for biosecurity and welfare purposes.

“It’s something we could put in place just to see where horses are going, where they’re currently situated, what movements they make in their lifetime,” the association’s Alexandra Bunton said.

“It will really help us be able to track diseases that go through horse populations or are passed on to other animals.”

The organisation called for government support to reduce costs for owners impacted by a traceability scheme.

Facing neglect and the knackery

Equine welfare advocates have also pushed for a national register to promote owner accountability and potentially deter negligent backyard breeding.

When Bianca Folber — who is part of the Australian Equine Unification Scheme — purchased a scrawny filly at an Echuca saleyard for just $120, it triggered her passion for horse owners to be made more accountable.

The horse, affectionately named Callie by her children, was underweight and unable to be transported to South Australia for two weeks until she regained her strength to survive the journey.

The auctioneer had no information on Callie to pass on to potential buyers, leaving Ms Folber in the dark about the filly’s age, breed and vaccinations.

“Currently the saleyards and the knackeries are seen as easy ways for people to dispose of their horses and it’s a bonus that they receive payment for doing so,” Ms Folber said.

She said if it was mandatory that only registered horses could be sold at saleyards or submitted to knackeries, people would either register the animals or stop breeding them.

Ms Folber also called for better control over which animals ended up at slaughterhouses.

“Through my volunteer work to improve equine welfare I have seen many cases of people giving away their beloved old horses to be companions and then they discover they have actually been sold for meat,” she said.

“The UK system allows for people to actually flag their horse as ‘not for slaughter’ and I feel Australian horse owners would benefit from a similar flag.”

Untangling multiple registers

Prior to the equine influenza outbreak in 2007, the Australian Horse Industry Council developed an emergency contact database to better track horses.

Ms Waugh told the inquiry that in August 2007 there were 800 horses registered but the outbreak prompted thousands of owners to register and add their details.

However, no ongoing funding was provided for the emergency register and it became redundant.

The industry and the Commonwealth spent more than $130 million to contain the outbreak.

The on-flow to the industry ran into the millions of dollars in lost income, cancellations, and restrictions on racing and breeding activities.

The Australian Horse Industry Council’s president, Mark Burnell, said the register was very effective at the time of the outbreak.

He said the council welcomed the introduction of a national register for safety and biosecurity purposes, but he said there were already multiple registers horse owners had to comply with.

“There’s concern from some organisations about an increased layer of compliance and cost ultimately to the horse owner,” he said.

Mr Burnell used the example of his daughter’s pony, which is registered across a number of organisations including pony club and interschool competitions.

“So the horse has three different names, she’s got a registered Welsh name, she’s got a paddock name, she’s got a pony club name, and we try to do the right thing.

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